Snelling research accepted by UK publisher Ashgate

Posted by Davina Jackson 14 October 2014
Douglas Snelling in the 1970s. Photo Max Dupain.

Douglas Snelling in the 1970s. Photo Max Dupain.

One of Britain's leading scholarly publishers, Ashgate, has approved publication of a book based on Davina Jackson's controversial PhD research on the life, work and significance of Douglas Snelling.

Jackson's proposal was endorsed by two anonymous academic reviewers – one from Britain and the other from Australia.

Ashgate's acceptance follows earlier 'in principle' approvals of the thesis by editors at the University of Melbourne's Miegunyah Press, UNSW Press and Thames and Hudson – but they were concerned about opposition from ANZ architectural history scholars.

London-based architecture editor Valerie Rose now has persuaded her Ashgate colleagues that Jackson's work is international in relevance and should add value to its Modernism in Architecture and History of Architecture lists.

Other offshore advances of recognition for the 'Douglas and Davina project' are:

—Editors of Architectural History, the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain's annual journal, are obtaining peer reviews on an 11,000 word essay by Jackson, promoting Gravesend-born Snelling as a colourful and talented 'Englishman abroad' during the mid-20th century.

(Jackson has suggested that Snelling could be Britain's strongest 'claim to fame' in the westwards (South Pacific) spread of California modern architecture, interior, landscape, graphic and furniture design – and that he seemed to be Britain's most exciting antipodean exponent of 'Tiki' architecture during the 1960s; when Sydney expatriates conversely were enlivening London's arts culture.)

—Editors of Routledge's forthcoming World of Modernism anthology have gone to press with a 3000-word article by Jackson on Australia and Pacific modern architecture and design. This includes minor mentions of Snelling to help rectify his absences from most 1970s through 1990s anthologies of Australian architectural history.