Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105Douglas Snelling’s life was constantly dynamic—but 1956 was one of its watersheds. Alone again after a 10 year marriage, he sold the half– completed dream house at Northbridge, rented the top floor apartment of an old duplex in Balfour Road, Rose Bay, and gathered his wits to create a different suite of conditions for developing his successful but still financially precarious practice. For several years, Snelling had been one of a handful of Sydney modernist architects favoured by the nation’s most progressive architecture journal—Architecture and Arts, edited in Melbourne by Kenneth McDonald. This magazine was usurping the Royal Australian Institute of Architects’ (RAIA) official journal, Architecture, by delivering readers a consistent flow of illustrated reportage on new schemes and buildings relevant to the agendas of post–war modernism. Its establishment rival was more old– fashioned—and Snelling’s works only occasionally featured there. After a few years of publication, editor McDonald decided that Architecture and Arts would promote itself and serve readers with a pair of annual architecture awards—one for the best Australian house and another for the nation’s best building, constructed the previous year. In the early 1950s, the RAIA did not have any national awards A rchitectural M aturity 1955– 1966 DOUGLAS SNELLING 57 1940–1955