Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 1051916– 1937 At the height of the First World War in early 1916—when the French and German armies had just begun the tumultuous Battle of Verdun—future architect Douglas Burrage Snelling was born at 18 Russell Road, in the ancient English village of Gravesend, Kent. His father, Albert Edward Snelling, was noted on the February 24 birth certificate as a 27–year–old journeyman bootmaker. His mother was Ethel May Snelling (née Burrage). Nothing has been found about the Snellings’ activities at Eastbourne, but the family left England when Douglas was young. His three sons believe that Albert, Ethel and Douglas lived during the early 1920s in Quito, the capital of Equador, while Albert helped to establish a footwear factory. The trio migrated to New Zealand in the English summer of 1924, when Albert was 35 and Douglas was eight. Ink–scripted passenger lists for the Savill & Albion Company steamship MV Corinthic show that they were registered by Customs in Auckland on 23 July, towards the end of a voyage that began in Southampton and terminated in the New Zealand capital, Wellington. Other records for the same ship, mastered by Captain Frank Hart, suggest that its usual route was via Colon and Panama—which allows speculation that the family may C H I L D H O O D DOUGLAS SNELLING 13 1916–1937