Page 1 Page 2 Page 3 Page 4 Page 5 Page 6 Page 7 Page 8 Page 9 Page 10 Page 11 Page 12 Page 13 Page 14 Page 15 Page 16 Page 17 Page 18 Page 19 Page 20 Page 21 Page 22 Page 23 Page 24 Page 25 Page 26 Page 27 Page 28 Page 29 Page 30 Page 31 Page 32 Page 33 Page 34 Page 35 Page 36 Page 37 Page 38 Page 39 Page 40 Page 41 Page 42 Page 43 Page 44 Page 45 Page 46 Page 47 Page 48 Page 49 Page 50 Page 51 Page 52 Page 53 Page 54 Page 55 Page 56 Page 57 Page 58 Page 59 Page 60 Page 61 Page 62 Page 63 Page 64 Page 65 Page 66 Page 67 Page 68 Page 69 Page 70 Page 71 Page 72 Page 73 Page 74 Page 75 Page 76 Page 77 Page 78 Page 79 Page 80 Page 81 Page 82 Page 83 Page 84 Page 85 Page 86 Page 87 Page 88 Page 89 Page 90 Page 91 Page 92 Page 93 Page 94 Page 95 Page 96 Page 97 Page 98 Page 99 Page 100 Page 101 Page 102 Page 103 Page 104 Page 105phoned Abe Assef, who was too far away, at his western suburbs surgery, to be able to join them immediately. The hotel’s doctor called an ambulance, but Snelling refused to enter it, cursing: ‘The hell with you people, there’s nothing wrong with me’. But again he collapsed in the hotel room he was sharing with Andrew—and this time lost consciousness because his aorta had ruptured. Now he was in no position to refuse the ambulance, which took him immediately to St Vincents Hospital, Darlinghurst. Assef arrived while Douglas was being wheeled into the hospital on a trolley and ‘he squeezed my hand, although he was very close to unconsciousness.’ Douglas Snelling died on 4 September 1985. The service was held in the chapel of Woollahra funeral directors Walter Carter, and the hearse took his body to the Eastern Suburbs Crematorium. Some months later, Christopher and his brothers took the urn containing their father’s ashes down to their uncle John Gale at Huntly, and asked him to cast the ashes in the same birch grove where Aida and Patricia’s remains had been cast (on ground marked by memorial plaques). Although Gale took the urn, he said he has ‘never got around’ to placing the architect’s remains beside those of his second wife and mother–in–law. He agreed that this oversight is because he had ‘never warmed to Douglas.’ Today, Snelling’s cremation ashes lie in the back of a cupboard at Huntly. DOUGLAS SNELLING DOUGLAS SNELLING 100 101 1976–1985 1976–1985